Archive for March, 2010

30 Old PC Ads That Will Blow Your Processor

Mar 31st, 2010

Many people today either are too young to have ever seen some early pc’s or have forgotten what they looked like and how much they cost. Today we complain about the cost of a laptop running 2Ghz with 4GB ram for a cost of $ 400.00, however it wasn’t that long ago that laptops and pc’s were priced quite a bit higher. Here are 30 Old PC ads that will make you laugh and possibly appreciate what you have today.



10MB Drive for $ 3398.00
Today you can get a 1TB drive for $ 85.00
1TB is about 100,000 times larger than 10MB


This is an early Laptop, with 64K of memory
Today laptops have 2 to 4 Gig of memory
4GB is about 64,000 times larger than 64K


Here are two disk systems, 80MB for $ 12K and 300MB for $ 20K
Today you can get a DVD that holds 4Gig for $ .75 each
A 4GB DVD is about 14 times larger than a 300MB Disk


Here is a 16K RAM Memory Card, $ 495.00
Today you can get 4GB RAM for $ 99.00
4GB Ram is about 256,000 times larger than 16K


This is an early modem, delivering 4800 BPS
Modems today deliver 56K
56K is about 12 times faster


This early PC is offering dual floppy drives and 128K of RAM
Today PC’s have between 2 to 4 GB RAM
4GB RAM is about 32,000 times larger than 128K


Yes this was my first video game system. Yes those are the joy sticks.
Todays game systems are far more advances in graphics, controlers, etc.


Here is another early laptop, this one can expand up to 640KB RAM
Today laptops have 2 to 4 Gig of memory
4GB is about 6,000 times larger than 640KB


Checkout this Amiga, promoting the quality of graphics it can produce.


Apple does it again, 5Mhz with 1MB RAM
Today PCs are 3Ghz with 4GB RAM
3Ghz is 600 times faster and 4GB RAM is 4000 times larger than 1MB RAM


This ATARI Computer has 48K or RAM and offers 128 colors
Today PC’s have 4GB RAM and offer 32 Bit color which is 4.2 billion colors


The TRS-80 was produced in the late 70’s and early 80’s with 1.7Mhz processor and 4KB RAM
Today PCs are 3Ghz with 4GB RAM
3Ghz is 1700 times faster and 4GB RAM is 1 Million times larger than 4KB RAM


This early pc offered a 13″ screen for just $ 3300.00


I’m not sure about the specs, but this looks more like a typewritter


The price is coming down, this pc offeres 4KB RAM for only $ 249.00


The ACE1000 offers 64KRAM and includes upper and lower case keys, plus num lock
Today pc’s offer 4GB RAM and all include shift keys plus num lock
4GB is about 6,000 times larger than 640KB


Get up and running right with this PC, offering 4K RAM and a cassette player
I’m not sure you can even buy cassette’s anymore


This was the latest and greatest in laptop design
How would you like to carry that around during school


The TRS-80 was produced in the late 70’s and early 80’s with 1.7Mhz processor and 4KB RAM
Today PCs are 3Ghz with 4GB RAM
3Ghz is 1700 times faster and 4GB RAM is 1 Million times larger than 4KB RAM


How about another 10MB Hard Drive for $ 3,495.00
Today you can get a 1TB drive for $ 85.00
1TB is about 100,000 times larger than 10MB


One of Mac’s early computers, offeres 32 Bit Processor


Here’s a 15MB Hard Drive for $ 2,495.00, the price is coming down
Today you can get a 1TB drive for $ 85.00
1TB is about 69,000 times larger than 15MB


This Tandy 5000 offers a blazing 20Mhz processor and 2MB RAM
Today PCs are 3Ghz with 4GB RAM
3Ghz is 150 times faster and 4GB RAM is 2000 times larger than 2MB RAM


Here’s a PC in a breifcase, complete with modem and 5″ monitor.
Today pc’s don’t have to plug the whole phone in, just the phone line and have up 22″+ monitors.


Checkout the joysticks and other options that come with this pc.


Produced in early 80’s, the VIC-20 came with 5KB RAM
Today pc’s come with 4GB RAM
4GB is about 838,000 times larger than 5KB


For only $ 999.00 you can get this pc that offers 384K RAM and 20M Hard Disk Card.
Today pc’s come with 4GB RAM and 500+ GB Drives
4GB is about 10,000 times larger than 384KB RAM and 500 GB drive is about 25000 times larger than 20M


Here’s a basic pc that offered 4K RAM that you had to hook up to a TV.


Another personal pc that offeres 4K RAM for under $ 199.95, but didn’t come with a monitor.

The ZX81 offered 1K RAM but expanded up to 16K RAM and could hook up to any TV

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Computer Languages and Hello World

Mar 31st, 2010

Have you ever wondered why Hello World seems to always be the first program that you learn in any computer programming language? Well, there are a lot of reasons why but here are a few quick ones:

  • It’s as basic of a program as you can write, just echo some words back onto the screen.
  • It’s a sanity check to make sure that the compiler actually is working properly
  • It’s been a tradition since 1974

The History of Hello World

Small test programs that are simple to write have really been around since the development of the modern day computer.  However, the first know usage of the phrase “Hello world!” in a programming tutorial came from the much revered book The C Programming Language by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie originally of Bell Laboratories.  The book was first released in 1978.  The example in the book prints “hello, world” without any capitalization or punctuation.  Mr. Kernighan actually first used the simple “Hello world!” program in an internal memo that circulated around Bell Laboratories in 1974.

This is the version from the book:

 int main()
 {
        printf("hello, world");
        return 0;
 }

Actually Mr. Kernighan was also responsible for the first usage of the words “hello” and “world” together in a computer instruction manual. This was his 1972 book titled Tutorial Introduction to the Language B.

This was the version that he used in the B language:

main( ) {
  extrn a, b, c;
  putchar(a); putchar(b); putchar(c); putchar('!*n');
}
a 'hell';
b 'o, w';
c 'orld';

So you can see that the traditions of using “Hello world!” in programming tutorials is now several decades old. So as you pick up a new programming language and start with the inevitable “Hello world!” remember Mr. Kernighan and whisper a quick thanks to the pioneers in the field of computer programming.

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